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e-mailed tomato question

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2004
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by Bill on June 01, 2004 05:32 PM
I have 40 tomato plants, 20 of which are in a screened enclosure in the
same garden. My plants all looked great until about a week ago. The ones
in the enclosure started first with about the first 2 or 3 inches of the
stem falling over and the leaves curling, they still stay green, then the
next day the ones outside starting doing the same thing, this is the first
time I have ever seen this and do not know what to do. I did spray with
liquid sevin hoping this might do some good. Can you help me with this. I
live the the Conroe Texas area. Thank you for your consideration .
by Tempest on June 02, 2004 09:30 AM
Did the wilting start at the top or bottom of the plant. I was not sure exactly what you meant by the "first three inches". The reason I ask is there is something called 'Fusarium wilt'. description: lower leaves turn ywllow, wilt, and die. Then upper shoots wilt and eventually the whole plant dies.When the stem is sliced lengthwise near the soil line, then tissue 1/8 inch under the surface id found to be dark brown.' It is caused by a fungus (fusarium oxysporum ssp. lycopersici) that affects only tomatoes. The cure according to this book is to rip up the contaminated plants to prevent further infection. Since I myself would be most reluctant to rip any of my green babies out of the ground even in sickness, i am including this recipe in hopes that maybe your tomatoes are only suffering a bit of a nutrient deficiancy. So I offer forth this recipe courtesy of Jerry Baker's Backyard Problem Solver (a book I highly recommend to ANY gardener) TOMATO BOOSTER TONIC: 2 tbsp epsom salts, 1 tsp baby shampoo, 1 gal. water. Mix these ingredients together, and liberally soak the soil around the tomato plants as they flower to stimulate their growth. It will help them take up more nutrients. You might also check into tobacco mosaic virus-often arrives courtesy of a cigarrette, but can be carried on contaminated plants or in containers they've been in contact with. It lives in the soil for as long as 5 years and infects plants in the Tobacco/Nightshade family i.e.- tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, and potatoes. The disease can also be spread by insects or human touch. Symptoms vary. I hope all this gives some help....
Tempest~ [dunno]
by weezie13 on June 03, 2004 03:25 PM
We had some conversations about that last year.
I think it's quite common....
Check these posts out and there's a picture,
see if it looks something like this..

Tomato leaves curling....HELP!!


Here's one too on the caring of them..
Tomato problem/ and caring for it.

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