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Drooping leaves on Dracaena Marginata

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by Sparky984 on April 16, 2004 08:53 AM
Hi,
I also have a dracaena marginata and I've noticed that the inner leaves are drooping. Also on one side of the plant, the tips of the leaves have dried up/turned brown. Am I under/overwatering? If anyone has any suggestions, I'd really appreciate it [Smile]
Also, there is a new, I guess you can say "branch" sprouting from the side of the main branch. Could I cut this off and replant it? The leaves are already as long as the original plant and its a problem because its growing underneath the other leaves and it will soon not have much space for growth. If so, where should I cut and should I leave it in water for a few days so that roots can grow? Thanks a lot!
by apples on April 16, 2004 11:15 AM
Hello! Welcome to the garden hleper.
I haven't been around much to help anyone lately as I've been getting out side to much, so hopfully I can help you [grin] . I think the drooping is natural. With age lower leaves droop quite a bit. The drooping in certin areas is probably just the leaves trying to get the light they need/want. I've heard that the tips can turn brown from hard water. You should practice using water that has been sitting out for a day or two so that all the chemicals dissapate. After a while build ups start to form which can harm the plants. D. Marginata seems to be a fairly though plant though. My moms has survived her treatment for quite some years now [Big Grin] .
You can remove the new branch however, I think the plant knows what it's doing. They can grow to be up to 10 feet and winding trunks are carictoristics of this plant, That's why they call it the madagascar dragon tree! The one in my house is already up to 7&1/2 feet!
It's growth like that which gives it such interesting shapes in the future. The little one on the bottom of this one curls up all the way to the back touches the wall and comes out into the front and is now on it's way up. They take fairly easily though. Just use a rooting hormone and if you can provide bottom heat. You could also air layer it and that way it's shure to take. Take a ring of bark off about as wide as the cane, brush on some rooting hormone on the inner layer. use two elactic bands to hold a baggy closed at both ends and fill it with moist peat or sphagnum moss. In a month or so you'll start to see roots forming, keep it their as long as you can stand and carefully remove it from the mother branch and pot it up! Unless you cut the branch right of to the trunk and even then maby, it's probably going to produce new growth again so you could use it as a source for cutting over and over again each time getting about two or three of the chopped branch. The plant is growing stuff there for a reason, again it knows what it's doing [Wink] but it's up to you.
Good luck.

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The answers will come when needed. Otherwise, I'm guesing time will make me feel silly.
by Jiffymouse on April 16, 2004 07:54 PM
good advice apples. the only other thing i would add, my draceana gets watered when the top of the soil is just starting to dry. that is how you tell if it is ready. as far as rooting them goes, i just cut them off, plop them in good potting or seed starting soil and water them the way i do the momma plant. so far has worked every time. my air layering has not [Frown]
by apples on April 16, 2004 10:35 PM
Good thing you brought that up I had just read that it was better but never realy done it. Layering is tough I guess cause you have to remove the oter bark and part of the first iner bark for it to work smoothly. The second iner bark brings water up to the branch the first one brings sugars down and helps the wound heal(don't want that)I think and the outer bark just heals over if you don't take it of all the way around. I guess I shoudn't realy give out info yet that I haven't tried my self! Practical aplication is the only true knowlage.

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The answers will come when needed. Otherwise, I'm guesing time will make me feel silly.
by Will Creed on April 17, 2004 07:40 PM
Sparky,

Marginatas are tricky. If you can e-mail a photo to me at wcreed@HorticulturalHelp.com, I can probably give you better advice after seeing it. I have had a lot of experience dealing with Marginatas.
by apples on April 18, 2004 05:19 AM
quote:
Practical aplication is the only true knowlage.
That's why Will Creed comes here! [thumb]

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The answers will come when needed. Otherwise, I'm guesing time will make me feel silly.

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