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Moving Roses

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2005
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by hlieder on December 02, 2005 12:29 AM
My Mother recently passed away and we will be selling her home soon. I would like to move some of her 30 year old roses over to my garden. The thing that concerns me is that it is now December and living in Canada, the ground will be freezing very soon.

Anything that I can do, any hints or is it a lost cause.

Harry
by mike57 on December 02, 2005 01:17 AM
[wavey] HI hlieder i am so sorry for your lose.in your (zone) its best move them in the spring BUT since you will be selling the house i do not think you have anything to loose by moving them now it would be worth a try since they are very special to you since they where your mothers i would give it a try.here a link on pruning them before you transplant them.use candle wax or wood glue to seal where you have pruned them back.
http://www.thegardenhelper.com/pruningroses.htm
http://www.thegardenhelper.com/movingspecimens.html
heres some information on transplanting them. Roses are best transplanted in late winter or early spring when they are coming out of winter dormancy.But for a successful transplant i have better luck in the spring than in late winter as the ground might be hard to dig and the cold could damage your plants. most roses are sold in the spring so its the best time to plant or transplant them.here is the best way i know of to transplant them.water the plant every day for a few days.then dig the hole where you plan on moving it to approximately 20 to 25 inches wide and 12 to 15 inches deep. Roses like soil that is rich in organic matter so mix generous amounts of organic matter into the soil that you dug out of the planting hole.i would recommend putting on some gloves and then prune back the rose as much as possible.then Dig a circle around the plant about 10 to 12 inches beyond where its drip line was. If you run across any roots cut them off with a pair of hand pruners.Continue to dig down about 15 inches until you can slip your shovel under the plant. Once you have undercut the rose bush you will should be able to remove it easily.When you lift the plant you will find that most of the soil might drop off the roots leaving them exposed.In the hole where your going to plant it make a mound of amended soil spread out the roots and set the plant on the mound. Be sure the mound is tall enough to hold the crown at the same level it was originally planted.then just backfill the hole about halfway with the amended soil and fill it with water.then when that drains add more soil to fill the hole and make a ring of soil around the hole with some of the soil.then flood the area again the ring of soil will help hold the water on the planted rose.after that water soaks in put in the rest of the soil to establish the finish grade.then dress the soil then top that with some good organic mulch.then water real well a couple of times till the ground starts to get real cold.you should start seeing new growth come spring.hope this helps and good luck with moving your mothers roses.your friend in gardening.mike57 [wavey] [flower] [flower]

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by melcon6 on December 02, 2005 03:31 AM
Harry, I'm so sorry about your mother's passing. [tears]

Maybe you could try moving some now as Mike suggested and also try appealing to the buyers, when you get some, a written agreement to allow you to return in the spring to dig them up. I'm sure you could work out something with them, I know I would definitely be agreeable to that , some people immediately rip things out anyway.

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY CINDY!!!!!!!
by hlieder on December 02, 2005 08:25 AM
Thanks for the responses........

I was thinking of a couple of stratigies. One would be to dig them up, after pruning of course and planting them in a pot and bringing in the house. Somehow I dont think that would work.

Another would be transplanting to a spot right near the house, where some of the heat off the house would give it a bit of warmth.

Any opinions on either of those?

Maybe, I will just have to appeal to the new owners..........Maybe, it wont sell until spring anyways.
by melcon6 on December 02, 2005 08:56 AM
quote:
Another would be transplanting to a spot right near the house, where some of the heat off the house would give it a bit of warmth.

I think that's a good idea too. Just lay a nice thick layer of leaves over it to be raked off in the spring.

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY CINDY!!!!!!!
by hlieder on December 02, 2005 11:34 AM
Thanks melcon.......I think I will give that a try. We are in Southern Ontaio, not that cold here in the winter. Generally doesn't get too far below freezing..............Although, there is usually a cold snap in January.
by RugbyHukr on December 03, 2005 04:18 AM
For temp, I would get a large pile of soil & heel the roses in for winter. Also, I would mulch heavily over that soil. As long as the roots don't freeze, you should be okay to plant in spring.

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