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Alpine vs. dwarf

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by tamara on January 07, 2004 04:43 PM
What's the difference in these two terms when buying trees and shrubs?

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by weezie13 on January 07, 2004 05:27 PM
Hi Tamara,
The only thing that I can think of right this second is, Alpine discribe's a living condition for the types of plants, and some alpines are a dwarf variety.... Alpine would be like,
let me think, like drier conditions sometimes,
I know when growing like Lavendar, they suggest that type, not too much nitrogen, and keep the base of the plant dry??? Mountainous, sloping, drains easily??? Rocky, hardscape??? Lack of overly abundant nutrients.??? Would that seem to make sense????

Dwarf would be the variety stays small.......
Or something that can be big, or bigger or really big, this variety is a dwarf of it, so it usually stays small....or compact??? or slow growing.???

I'm sure someone else will be through...

Weezie

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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by rue anemone on January 08, 2004 04:12 PM
Weezie 13 that is what I think.

Alpines like what ever type of weather would be mountain condtions, rocky, sandy, dry, snow cover in the winter.

What is dwarf to some might be huge. The dwarf burning bush gets to 5-8 feet, the regular get 10-15 feet

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