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Caring for ice cream tree advice

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2006
by Jumpybean on March 05, 2006 01:15 PM
I asked this on another forum but thought the question would fit this forum's topic better.
quote:
About my front yard: I got an "ice cream tree" from one of my college professors and planted it in the ground today but am unsure of how to care for it as I could not find much information on the internet about how to grow one. (I did find some sites though that called it the ice cream bean tree.) The professor (who I think knows a lot about plants because he teaches classes about them) did give me some instructions but I just want some outside advice to make sure I know how to care for the tree properly.
The plant's leaves are a bit yellowish in color (I think the professor said it was because the plant had to endure through winter's cold temperatures here in California) and one of the branches looks like it might break. The spot where I planted it receives some sunlight, but occasionally is shaded over by the house or trees some feet away. I'm worried about the soil conditions but I'm told that Temple City has good soil. No pictures of it yet, although I could tried to take and upload some if you want.

I don't know much about gardening [Confused] so any advice would be appreciated.

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by Jumpybean on March 12, 2006 01:05 PM
It's getting kind of cold outside for my tree. I don't know if I should repot it and take it back inside or not. When will the weather be warm enough for it? Today's High is 54 C and low is 40 F where I live when I looked it up. A website I looked up said the Inga edulis tolerates annual mean temperature of 21.3 to 27.3°C. Inga edulis habitat

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by Jiffymouse on March 12, 2006 11:36 PM
jumpy, i've been watching this to see what the tree is. thank you for posting the link for info. i'm not sure where in so.cal you are, but depending on that, the tree might do ok (not great, but ok) until it is established. then, established plants do better than new ones. does that make sense?
by Jumpybean on March 13, 2006 12:49 PM
I edited my profile so that it would be more specific about my current living location (Temple City).

Oh, and I managed to upload some pictures I took 5 days ago according to the date on the photos.

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The tips of the leaves are a bit dried and brown. Not sure if that means that it needs more water or something else like it needs warmer temperatures.
Can anyone tell what species this tree belongs to by the photos? The professor who gave it to me didn't know and I don't know either.

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by Jiffymouse on March 13, 2006 12:59 PM
my thought would be a good ground soaking then let it dry for a few days.
by Jumpybean on March 13, 2006 01:44 PM
It rained a bit the last couple of days... maybe I should wait a while before trying that.

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by Jiffymouse on March 13, 2006 10:38 PM
yep. might want to. give it a good soak when you stick your finger in the dirt half way out from the trunk and it is nearly dry or completely dry.
by Jumpybean on March 19, 2006 05:06 AM
My family's house is undergoing construction right now and I don't know if I should move the plant since I put it near where the construction work is. (work may go on for another 2 months) There were some white paint spots on the plant (which I removed) and on some of the grass on the lawn too.
Again unsure if the plant is doing okay [scaredy]
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I watered it a lot today. The bottom leaf is getting old (according to the professor who gave me this tree). The ground had some cracks before I watered it, so maybe the soil contains some clay. Not sure what to do about it.

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There are brownish white splotches on the leaves and on the tips and I don't know why. Too much sun or water (or low temperature), maybe?
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Are the leaves getting lighter in color or am I imagining things?

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by seeme on March 22, 2006 12:29 AM
that dirt looks really soggy!maybe lay off on watering it.
by Jumpybean on March 22, 2006 11:37 AM
The tips of the leaves seem to be browning. I don't know if the air around the construction site may be causing this or not. Also, the leaves are becoming yellower in color (maybe not enough sun?).

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by Sherin on March 22, 2006 07:41 PM
Hi, Jumpybean! I hope the little guy makes it. I'm going to see if I can't find out more about that tree. Knowing exactly what species it is would go a long way to making sure it lives and to make sure that it isn't some kind of mamouth-tree-monster that may outgrow it's current location etc. and get into powerlines,foundation,septic tanks etc. (really an interesting little fellow).....brb

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"Seedlings,sprouts,fronds and cones--unfurl your green slippers,your rest is done."
by Jumpybean on March 23, 2006 03:45 AM
I moved it back into the container today...not sure if I should plant it in the same spot again or move it into the house. My house is at the corner of a street though and there are a lot of cars passing by, so maybe that contributes to higher amounts of pollutants in the air here.

There are also reddish brown areas on some of the leaves and some dried spots. The leaves look like they may curl up and are drooping a bit. I guess I'll stop watering it for a week or so since the soil is damp when I checked it today. The top of the soil looked dry to me the past couple of days so I may have overwatered (?) it to make the top wet.

I am trying out what I read on one of this site's pages (got some water in a juice container and let it stand for a while). Maybe it'll help get rid of some of the chemicals in the water

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by Jumpybean on March 23, 2006 12:29 PM
It probably was a good thing I moved it earlier today. I found rubble on the spot where I had the plant in earlier so there could be a chance that some rubble may have fallen on the plant while construction work was being done on the house. [Frown]
So it's likely safer for me to keep the plant farther away from the site, at least until the remodeling is finished.

Now all I have to worry about is
  • air humidity and pollutants
  • amount of lighting, indirect probably better
  • plant illnesses and pathogens
  • soil conditions in the pot (nutrients, organisms in soil, etc.)
  • temperature and weather
  • water needs and chemicals in the water
  • whether the plant needs more room for its roots
  • any other important factors I forgot to list... [thinker]


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by Jumpybean on March 24, 2006 05:01 AM
One of the leaves looks very dry. Should I stop watering it for a while since I just moved it back into a pot? Also, I don't know how humid it should be for my plant and whether I should stop misting it (at least not while it's sunny and the misting may cause water droplets and scars on the leaves). I guess I'm just worried I may kill the plant or something.

Would this topic now fit the container planting forum? Should I move it to that forum or not?

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by Sherin on March 24, 2006 06:38 AM
Wow! What a mystery as to what exactly this tree is! I looked on every university forestry extension office from British Columbia to Cornell and could not identify it! Looks very close to some common hardwoods in Eastern U.S. but given your location--I would tempt to guess it is some kind of tropical. The conditions of the leaves remind me of one very finicky orchid I have. It had developed dry spots like your tree because of the lack of air movement. Typically, yellowness on leaves is systemic of overwatering. Brown tips on the edges of leaves usually indicate an environment where it got too hot and too dry too quickly. Who knows what the little dear went through before he/she came to you but certainly you'll take good care of it. Good luck!

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"Seedlings,sprouts,fronds and cones--unfurl your green slippers,your rest is done."
by Jumpybean on March 24, 2006 12:33 PM
I am thinking of moving the plant again. I'm not sure if the roots grew too big for the container (can that happen in a week?) but then would that be too much shock for the plant?

Most of the dry spots and dried leaf tips came after I had it for a week and planted it near where the house is undergoing construction (so I don't know how well I'll take care of it -_-). I can't really help it being too hot or too dry in the area where I live unless I were to move the plant into the house. I don't think the dry spots are due to lack of air movement though; there were some strong winds outside in the past week (if I remembered correctly). The professor said that its genus is Inga and that it is in the bean family. Maybe that will help with your search?

I really should stop watering it for a while. The soil and plant always looks too dry to me though.

More pictures!
 - Not sure why this leaf dried up.  -
The soil looks okay (I think). Still deciding how often I should water.

EDIT: I'm thinking that maybe I should return it to my (former) professor instead. I don't want to put a lot of effort into it (and now that it's in a container, it's more dependent on me) only for it to die because of something I did wrong.

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by Jumpybean on March 26, 2006 02:14 AM
When I put it in the pot a few days ago, the roots apparently grew more than enough to touch the container sides and the root tips (1/8 inch maybe) pointed upward when I put it in. Don't know if I should put it in a larger pot soon.

I've been told that it grows fast, so I probably should change the pot sometime this year. I think it might do better in the summer as long as the (dry desert) heat doesn't dry it up.

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by Jumpybean on March 29, 2006 06:16 AM
I think the minimum temperatures here in Temple City (zone 10a) should be okay for Inga edulis and Inga feuillei after reading from this source (Tropical Plants by Hardiness). So I think the temperature at least will be okay for my tree (even though I don't know what species it is.
My tree looks green for the most part but the leaves feel a bit dry. It started raining yesterday and the forecast says it will continue to rain tomorrow so maybe that might help with humidity (?).

Random statement: I noticed now that there is only one space between sentences even when I type two or three between them. I don't know why really.

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by Jumpybean on April 01, 2006 01:08 PM
The tips of the leaves keep turning brown, curled, and dried further up the leaves. I don't know what could be causing this and what I can do about this. Can someone please answer this? Not sure if it has to do with soil dampness, type of water (sprinklers ok?), or pollutants in the air since I live in L.A.

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by Jumpybean on April 10, 2006 11:47 AM
The tree's trunk is cracking in the middle. I was thinking that it could be because of strong winds recently. How do I prevent the trunk from moving too much that the tree breaks into pieces? I would put a pole into the ground to support the tree but it might be too small and is still in a pot.

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