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help me with my fusarium yellows on my glads

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2005
by Tamara from Minnesota on September 24, 2005 09:36 PM
I have about 100 older glads and 50 new glads and they all became infected for the first time this year. I researched and found it to be fusarium yellows. I suppose I should dig them up and destroy them but what about the soil and what about planting glads in the future? I have been wanting to call into a TV questions for gardeners thing but am never home at that time with the TV on. So what should I do? Will I be able to grow glads again? I do not have anywhere else to plant them but maybe a few feet from this year's spot. [dunno] [tears]

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by weezie13 on September 25, 2005 01:54 AM
Do you happen to have a picture of them???

And tell us a bit about your area where you had them........

And what your watering practices are, night, day?
and how you water, rain water, town water, by hose, by drip irragation, by watering can???

And fertilizers you used, if any?

And what you have for soil?? Types, regular dirt,
bagged, are they in the ground, or in containers?

And are they in the sun? Shade?

And what do you have UNDER THE PLANTS?
ie; mulch, landscaped fabric, regular dirt???

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Tamara from Minnesota on September 25, 2005 09:38 AM
Ok I will try to be more specific.
My glads grow in my garden as an edger for my vegetables. I dig them up in fall, dry them and store them in paper bags in the basement- not the recommended way but I have never had problems. As I said about 100 of them are from previous years. Last year I had awesome blooms that would have won at the fair! This year I bought 50 more as I always do. In spring the rabbits ate down many of them but most grew back. As the old ones started to get tall and bloom they looked shrively and had disease on the leaves and the blooms were pale and wouldn't open all the way. They weren't horrible and some of them I would cut for vases. I tried to keep from touching those and the new ones that seemed better, but eventually some of the new ones looked infected too.
Ok fertilizer, I don't do much. I used Garden's Alive vegetables alive and root crops alive in the soil preplanting this year and didn't do any more fertilizing until late. So the glads were not fertilized except for that light early feeding of root crops Alive mostly. I water with soaker hoses usually in the morning but sometimes in evening as it is a soaker hose anyway. It is city water. We have sandy soil here so it is well-drained, but I have added lots of compost and manure over the years. the soil is about perfect in consistency but I should do the soil test I have been putting off. The garden is in full sun and the area the glads were in was -half (the new glads) were by my onions and half were by my potatoes and a little bit my the cucumbers. So that area had no weed blocker like the rest of the garden. I might have planted my glads a little deeper this year than last year. The disease started midsummer. I do have a picture. We had a bad hailstorm on Wednesday and this is how they looked after the storm.
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Not so pretty! I am embarrassed, but it was a bad storm and the potatoes and onions were gone anyway and that looks bad.

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by weezie13 on September 25, 2005 10:12 AM
How many years in a row have you planted
the glads in the same place???

And how were the rains this summer for you??

And what vegetables did you plant by them
last year?

Also, did you do the weed blocker last year too???

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Tamara from Minnesota on September 26, 2005 09:05 AM
[scaredy] Agh I don't know! My garden area for veggies is 22x22 so obviously I cannot rotate like I would want to. I think I had them by my tomatoes and that might have done something. But I think it more likely that it was helped by the rabbits eating them. But what I need to know is what I should do. I assume I need to dig up and destroy my bulbs, but what about next year? Is it worth trying again next year? I read that fusarium lives indefinitely. But regardless I am planning to do weekly fungus sprays all year long. This year I got sick in July and couldn't do stuff like that for 3 weeks and it was very hot. Our season was like this: nice in March, cold and rainy in late April and May, hot and dry in June and July, cool in August and average but rainy now. I will miss having glads. they were so beautiful last year! [tears]

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by Tamara from Minnesota on September 29, 2005 08:19 AM
Now that I answered all those questions is there anyone who can tell me what to do about my glads? I will dig them up and throw them out this weekend and then what about the future? [dunno]

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by MaryReboakly on September 29, 2005 01:15 PM
Tamara, from what I'm reading, rotating is recommended when you have this happen. If you don't have another place for glads, you might skip a year or two - may be plan for a bed of annuals next year. I would throw away any (possibly all?) corms. I hope that helps. Good luck and let us know how it goes!

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by weezie13 on September 29, 2005 07:37 PM
Sorry Tamara...
Those [Roll Eyes] darn kids of mine get in the
way of my gardening [Wink] ....

I had tried reading up on some info on
that stuff...*I was thinking the dirt conditions
and not rotating would be a factor with this stuff*

Gladiolus Disorder in File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat **You might have to have Adobe to
read it, if you don't and can't read it, let me
know I will find you some more info on it...**

There's a picture with it, is this similar
to what you have??
I was also thinking you might have RUST..

Also, do some experimenting next year...
If you do as many glads as you have, put them
in several different places in your property..
One that would get some more rain, some in a drier area, ect.. You may find that a different place with different conditions, will give you your results...
I have a rust in my property, and depends on the
year and amounts of rain fall really along with
temps that are higher...
One year I'll get it bad, the next year not hardly at all... because of the weather..
but different parts of my property act differently.

Also, you may try a different "mulch" on top..
and experiment with different types too, fabric's, compost, bark chips..etc....

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Tamara from Minnesota on September 30, 2005 08:26 AM
Thanks. I think I will take next year off and destroy plants as it occurs after that, whilst spraying. I had read that article before to diagnose the problem and it depressed me! [tears]

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by weezie13 on September 30, 2005 10:57 AM
I am forever experimenting..
so don't get depressed, just
try different things for them...
It may very well work...

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Tamara from Minnesota on October 02, 2005 11:24 AM
I dug up and got rid of my corms yesterday. It was very sad because some of them were several inches across. I think I will not buy any next year and see what happens after that. I have a flower bed at church and I could put some there I guess. I do recommend Wind Song from Pinetree Seeds. It is huge and beautiful! Glads were my favorite flower as a kid. [tears]

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