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Lawn Question: What kind of Grass?

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by Tim Burton on April 15, 2005 12:34 AM
Hi, I live in Phoenix, Arizona. My parents and I are deciding on what we should plant in our yard. We finally got grass to grow after years of dirt, it was wintergrass and it was very enjoyable.

Well, not it is time to plant grass for the summer. We don't really like Bermuda, but we need something that can handle high traffic.

I enjoy going out into the yard and laying on the grass and such (when summer comes it'll be in the night) [Wink]

Is there any grasses we can plant in our environment other than Bermuda, that will allow traffic on it?
by tkhooper on April 16, 2005 02:54 PM
I hope something in this helps. I searched around since I don't know anything personally.

Centipede, Southerners in the know call centipede grass -- the lazy man's grass. That's because this light green grass grows slowly and requires less mowing and fertilizing than most other warm-season grasses. Centipede grass is very well suited for the sandy soils of the Southeast and Gulf states. It is coarsely textured, low growing, and somewhat cold-tolerant (to 5 o F).

Bahia, likes alot of water so probably not.

Bermuda, you said you didn't want this one.

Buffalo, This one won't handle traffic well.

Carpet, This will handle the heat and the traffic but it's going to take water. It's used on a lot of golf courses.

St. Augustine, This one won't handle traffic well.

Zoysia This one will take sever weather conditions and tolerate traffic.

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by 4Ruddy on April 16, 2005 08:07 PM
TK...I know absolutely NOTHING about grass except that I have St. Augistine. It is SO thick and green...and mine handles traffic really well. The runners take off easy. The only problem I have with it is it makes mowing a little more of a chore because of it being so thick and it is a little more difficult to get up when putting in a new bed, but most of that is because I am little andd puney! I like the way it edges and it will choke out weeds. I (not knowing what I am doing) bought a bag of fesque(?)seeds to put in bare spots in the back yard when we had some trees cut down...it is so baby fine...and doesn't handle traffic at all. Live & learn! [dunno]

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Happiness, like a dessert so sweet.
May life give you more than you can ever eat...
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by tkhooper on April 16, 2005 10:28 PM
That's great to hear about the St. Augustine's. One thing about reading articles that "score" certain attributes is that they very seldom tell you what the unit of measure is. It sounds like that might work for him too.

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by Jiffymouse on April 23, 2005 04:41 AM
st augustine is what i want, it is good stuff...

AND gramma recommended [Big Grin]
by Karin Winn on May 02, 2005 12:05 AM
4Ruddy: What do you do seasonally to make your St. Augustine grass so thick, wonderful? Would you share your secrets, as this year our grass, especially under one of our live oak trees seems very sparse. I know it's probably late, especially in Dallas, Texas, but I thought I'd give it a try, using an organic fertilizer which has to be applied every other month or so. We came here from Oregon where the only problem was moss! We have no idea what is the right direction to take.

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Wannabeinoregon
by Jiffymouse on May 02, 2005 04:03 AM
karin, st. augustine grass likes the sun. so, to grow it under an oak is a challenge at best. also, the ph level of the soil from the oak makes it awkward too. add to that the surface roots, and my best bet for under large oaks is a raised flower bed!

now, all of that said, i have seen it doen, if the tree is trimmed so that the canopy isn't too thick. takes an awful lot of work though.
by Karin Winn on May 02, 2005 05:31 PM
Looking out at the lawn, I'm beginning to agree, Jiffymouse, and think a ground cover under both trees is the answer. What would you recommend? You're probably in the same zone as I am, so your recommendations would be right on. Do you have St. Augustine? and what do you to seasonally to "feed" it? We're into our second year in Texas, and haven't hit on the right mix yet. Thanks~

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Wannabeinoregon

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