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Erosion Stoppers

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2005
by Jennifer_H on January 29, 2005 06:29 PM
HI! I need some assistance. We have a stream running along the back edge of our property. Most of the time it is a trickle, but can get very full after heavy rain. What's happening is that when they stream fills, we are seeing the sides erode at an alarmingly fast rate! The soils is mostly clay & rocky.

What can I plant or do to help slow down this erosion!

Thanks,
Jennifer

PS- I am in New Jersey & will act on this in March when we thaw out! [Smile]
by obywan59 on January 29, 2005 08:24 PM
Houttuynia (pronounced how-tyne-ia)is said to be good for holding stream banks. However, it can be invasive, so you might need to use edging around it.

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Terry

May the force be with you
by hisgal2 on February 01, 2005 06:05 AM
Hi Jennifer [wayey] (that's my name too!!)

I live just across the river in Pa! We have a hill in front of our house and there is periwinkle and English ivy planted on the hill. With all of the rain that we've had this past year, our hill hasn't eroded at all. If you go with the english ivy, be extremely careful...it horribly invasive and a simple edging will not stop it. You may also want to consider planting a fast growing bush at the edge of that slope. We have some forsythia bushes on a hill that is in our yard and it's roots keep the hill from eroding....which is the only reason those bushes are still there!!!

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by Jennifer_H on February 02, 2005 12:30 AM
Thanks everyone...
I need to stop the erosion on the sides of the stream. Can I plant shrubs on the slope?

It partially shady- will that affect the suggestions you've given me?
by weezie13 on February 02, 2005 12:35 AM
Hi Jennifer_H,
Welcome to The Garden Helper's Forum!!
We're very glad you found us!!!

How much room do you have/?
#1. How long is the stream
#2. How much do you want covered?
#3. What's planted there right now?
Like to make it shady???

Weezie

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by mike57 on February 02, 2005 01:23 AM
english ivy workes great at stoping ersion.i use it on a stream that flowes beside my home it will stop the erosion but it take a while to get established so you get a good root system going.but it is very invasave you might have to keep it trimed so it dosnt grow out in to the midel of your yard.it works great but requires some maintnance.good luck with you drainage project.your friend in gardening.mike57

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No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent.
by Jennifer_H on February 02, 2005 01:53 AM
The stream rus thru the length of the back of my yard. The depth of the slope is about 3 feet. The soil is clay & rocky. There is mostly shade over the stream. Nothing is growing there now.
by Jennifer_H on February 02, 2005 01:59 AM
Sorry Weezie- I think I forgot to answer all your questions...

I want to cover as much as I need to stop the erosion. It is not an area that is open or an area that people walk over to/ sit near by. I will plant something else at the top edge- for asthetics, but also to stop people from walking to close & tripping/ falling in!

It sounds like I've gotten a few good ideas to look into.

Stupid qquestion here: Should I plant about 1/2 way down the slope? Or lower?
by weezie13 on February 02, 2005 06:56 PM
Jennifer,
The ivy does work, and yes it can be invasive...
Also *my personal nemisis* Bishop's Weed can be used too, especially for shadey areas, but also it can take over in unwanted places too over time... It's a likeable plant as far as color... lightens up shadey areas.
And does it's jobe well...
***Why I don't personally like it is I have it planted where it's not wanted and it's a nuisance to get rid of, hence why it's so good to do what you want it to do...
The first post with the Houttuynia like Terry suggested is kind of in the same family...also very pretty colors.....

Weezie

P/S also go take a peak around some of your streams and creeks around the area, *take pictures if you don't know what they are*....
and you should see some of the native plants already doing the same type of job you'd like done.

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by weezie13 on March 13, 2005 06:33 PM
Jennifer_H,
Here's another idea that may work
for you..
Takes a wee~bit of work, but may offer some
erosion control and something nice to look at..

Click on One year later - the results

Here's the entire page on how it was made..

Weezie

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Jennifer_H on March 14, 2005 04:16 PM
Thanks- now that the weater has started to take a turn for the warmer.. I will try to get back there & take some photos and post them so you can see what I am describing. I've received some great ideas so far!

Thanks,
Jennifer

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