Hummingbird House The Garden Helper
No-dash-here, you've found The Real Garden Helper! Gardening on the Web since 1997
vine bar
Wild Willy
 

Celery

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2005
« Prev thread: CELEBRATE good times woohoo| Next thread: Celery »
Back to Thread index
by ChristinaC on October 04, 2005 09:10 AM
Does anyone grow celery? I started mine from seed mid March. It's still not ready!! I suppose it's edible but it's still so green...very tough! What's going on?
Christina

* * * *
 -
 -
by papito on October 05, 2005 12:57 AM
I only grow celery from left over stalks.

The following info is from the Sunset Vegetable Gardening Book.

quote:
Celery needs 4-month long cool growing season. To grow mild-tasting celery, you must use some sort of blanching technique. For example, 3 to 4 weeks before you're going to harvest celery, tie the tops of the stalks together and mound garden soil along the stalks to shut out sunlight. When you're ready to harvest, pull away the soil and cut off the celery plants.

Or you can place a 3-pound coffee can with both ends removed over the seedlings when you plant them, or make tarpaper cylinders or sleeves to slip over the plants. The celery stalks will grow up inside the can or sleeve in a tight clump.

Celery is ready to harvest in 105 to 130 days after planting, when stalks are two-thirds to fully grown.


* * * *
 -
 -

Amor est vitae essentia.
Love is the essence of life.
by tkhooper on October 05, 2005 01:25 AM
Thanks for the info papito. That definitely wouldn't have worked for me. I'm glad you saved me a bunch of work.

* * * *
 -
 -
by PAR_Gardener on October 05, 2005 03:40 AM
Christina,

Celery does require a long growing season, but it is also very frost tolerant. I've had celery survive my zone 5 winters; (It's a biannual so don't expect much of a celery crop the second year.) If you started in mid-March, you may still grow for another month. You will probably have to blanch it though.

You have to remember that what you buy in the store is usually the celery hearts, hence not as green, and they were probably blanched a bit too. Blanching will also make the flavor more mild and the stalks less stringy.

* * * *
Composting is more than good for your garden. It's a way of life.
by ChristinaC on October 05, 2005 04:35 AM
Thanx Papito and Par Gardener. I suppose I could have looked that up myself. I apologize for being lazy but I've found I get better answers from everyone here. Thanx again.
Christina

* * * *
 -
 -

Active Garden Forum

« Prev thread: CELEBRATE good times woohoo| Next thread: Celery »
Back to Thread index
Similar discussions: