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Dividing plants

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2004
by goin34 on April 19, 2004 04:15 PM
What exactly is the best way to "divide" plants that are already planted in the ground? [Roll Eyes]
by weezie13 on April 19, 2004 04:19 PM
Hey Goin34,
Very Quick HI [wayey] And Welcome, on a short run today as I'm on my way to school with the wee~one, but got a question for you!!

*(so the gardeners can answer you a bit better and faster when they come thru!!!)

What kind of plants do you have and are inquiring about???
Different plants need different times and ways to divid???
Do you know the names of them!!
And how long have the plants you're wondering about been in the ground??

Again!!! Welcome,
will talk later to you!!! [gabby]
Weezie [gabby]

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by goin34 on April 20, 2004 05:31 PM
The first ones I am wondering about are a couple of rose mallows I planted in fall 2002 and they are pretty big already. (About 2.5 feet high and 2 feet wide) I was just curious what will happen if I just leave them - will they keep growing bigger? Will they stay pretty much at there present size?

Since there are different ways to do it for each plant, perhaps you direct me to the place on this site (or a book to recommend) where I could get that information. I just don't want any my plants to die because I did not divide them.
by obywan59 on April 20, 2004 06:03 PM
Rose mallows can be divided in spring or fall with good results. You can also take cuttings in summer if you simply want more plants, however plants can be allowed to remain indefinitely as roots do not spread underground. They won't die if you don't divide them.

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Terry

May the force be with you
by Ravensrun65 on April 22, 2004 03:52 PM
"Since there are different ways to do it for each plant, perhaps you direct me to the place on this site (or a book to recommend) where I could get that information. I just don't want any my plants to die because I did not divide them."

If you make a list here, I'm sure you will get the answers you're looking for, and it may help others with the same questions for the same plants! I'll try my best to help you, and I know others will too. I'm hoping to find out the answer to you asking, will the mallow get bigger? Cause I've got a few in the ground and would like to know how tall they'll get, cause I've got them under the telephone lines and don't want to have to cut just the tops off!
So, please, ask away!
Thanks,
Raven

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"I would feel more optimistic about a
bright future for mankind if we spent less
time proving that we can outwit Mother Nature
and more time tasting her sweetness and
respecting her seniority."
by obywan59 on April 22, 2004 04:06 PM
There appears to be a difference of opinion on dividing rose mallow. I have a different book that says "once established, clumps dislike disturbance and are difficult to move."

Also according to this book, rose mallow can grow 4-8 feet tall and 3-5 feet wide.

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Terry

May the force be with you
by weezie13 on April 23, 2004 01:48 AM
Just a quick response and I'll hit my
email notification thingie to remind me to come back to this post again!!!
(I get forgetfull every now and again,
and you have to get after me!!)

My understanding of the basic mallow's are
that they are very deep rooted!!!
And dislike being moved!!!! [Frown]
Because of the deep tap root, it is very hard
to get to the bottom of it without breaking it!!
I have moved a few when they are young and in early spring and the ground is still very moist..

Weezie

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by alankhart on April 25, 2004 10:21 PM
As Weezie mentioned, Rose Mallows once established are rather deep rooted, so if you want new plants it's best to take cuttings or grow them from seed, both of which can be done quite successfuly. I have several, but my red 'Lord Baltimore' is the largest...it grows about 6' tall by 5' wide. My 'Lady Baltimore', 'Fantasia', and 'Blue River II' get just as wide, but not quite as tall. I also have 'Copper King' and a 'Disco Bell Pink' that only gets about 3' tall.

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by goin34 on April 30, 2004 05:29 PM
Everyone's answers on the rose mallows are just what I wanted to hear - I don't really want to bother to divide them, but do not want to lose them or have them get much bigger either.

To answer Raven's question, at this time, I don't have many others that are getting too big. But my oriental lilies are starting to reproduce, and the yarrow will probably be the next one I may need to divide. Other things I have planted:
beard tongue, sundrops, flax, garden phlox, bellflower, shasta daisy and trumpet vine.

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