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astilbe problem

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by CapeCod on August 17, 2006 04:27 AM
Hello to all...I have several astilbe that I have planted over the last 4 yrs. Last year we lost 2 - they turned brown starting from the bottom and eventually died. The 2 plants were about 15 feet apart and the 8 plants in between were fine. This year we are losing several more in different parts of the garden. They were fine until about a week ago and now I am seeing the brown bottoms appear again. Any thoughts on what this might be and how to fix it? Thanks in advance.
by alankhart on August 17, 2006 06:35 AM
Astilbes need plenty of moisture, especially in hot weather. Mine often turn brown in summer after blooming and I cut them down to the ground...they soon regrow new foliage.

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by netty on August 17, 2006 09:21 AM
I'm having the same problem with several of my Astilbe. I don't think they like the heat we have been having and they just can't seem to get enough water. I'll cut mine down to the ground too.

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by weezie13 on August 17, 2006 01:38 PM
Yep, moisture was my guess too!!!

Can you tell us what kind of soil they're in?
And how much you were or weren't watering...

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by patches1414 on August 17, 2006 08:55 PM
CapeCod, my Astilbe are turning brown a little earlier this year too, but I think it's the extreme hot temperatures we've been having. I keep mine plenty moist but I don't soak them because I don't believe they like their feet standing in water!

I've never cut mine down after blooming, does this help them???

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"Lord, I love you and I need you, come into my heart, and bless me, my family, my home, and my friends, in Jesus' name. Amen!"
by johnCT on August 18, 2006 12:23 AM
What kind of conditions are they planted in? Are they mulched?

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John - Zone 6
by CapeCod on August 18, 2006 05:02 AM
The astilbe that turned brown last year were in a row of 10 against the foundation in the back of the house. Interestingly enough it was only #'s 1 and 10 that died (very convenient as it meant that my stand was still symmetrical!!). Given the responses, I am now thinking that the ends were missed by the sprinkler system! I think the heads are in front of these 2 plants. This year's "brown out" may be the watering problem also. Cape Cod doesn't have soil...it has sand! Actually, we trucked in topsoil that is very dense and amended it. We are now getting our first sign of earthworms after 4+ years. Oh, they are mulched too.
I think I am going to try watering them by hand regularly to see if they come back. Thanks to all of you for your thoughts so far.
by weezie13 on August 18, 2006 05:35 AM
quote:
I think I am going to try watering them by hand regularly to see if they come back.
They won't come back this season/summer...
It'll be next spring/early summer when you
see them pop back up!!!

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by patches1414 on August 18, 2006 05:56 AM
quote:
Mine often turn brown in summer after blooming and I cut them down to the ground...they soon regrow new foliage.

I've never done that! Does it help them and when do they regrow the new foliage?

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"Lord, I love you and I need you, come into my heart, and bless me, my family, my home, and my friends, in Jesus' name. Amen!"
by alankhart on August 18, 2006 07:16 AM
It certainly makes mine look better. It only takes a couple of weeks to start seeing new foliage, but they don't get as big as they do in spring.

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by patches1414 on August 18, 2006 10:14 AM
Thanks for the information. I was wondering if it will make it better or worse in the spring, or not make any difference at all.

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"Lord, I love you and I need you, come into my heart, and bless me, my family, my home, and my friends, in Jesus' name. Amen!"
by weezie13 on August 18, 2006 11:05 AM
One thing to remember between the conversation
between you two gardeners' is your individual gardening growing zones..

For Alan in Tn, he may get a few extra weeks in the fall time and earlier spring times too..
Where Patti here in the upper North is shorten on both sides....both spring and fall for a few weeks on either side..

So when Alan trims his back, his has time to re~grow a bit before it has to go to sleep for winter, *if really at all, can't remember how cold his winters get* but I do know that sometimes double cutting like that for a plant that not only blooms late in the season, and then has to go to bed early for winter... it might not be too good of an idea...

Or at least the knowledge of what may or may not do for it...

Winters come early and cold around here..

Just an observation from a Northern gardener... [Embarrassed] [kissies] [thumb]

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by alankhart on August 18, 2006 12:04 PM
Our first frost is often not until sometime in November, so my growing seadon is quite long (starting in March)....so that is definitely something to consider.

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by patches1414 on August 18, 2006 01:10 PM
Thnaks, Weezie! I'm in zone 5, so I think I'll just leave it alone like I've always done! We may have a longer season than some people, but a shorter season than many do!

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"Lord, I love you and I need you, come into my heart, and bless me, my family, my home, and my friends, in Jesus' name. Amen!"
by weezie13 on August 18, 2006 01:52 PM
quote:
Originally posted by alankhart:
Our first frost is often not until sometime in November, so my growing seadon is quite long (starting in March)....so that is definitely something to consider.
We're lucky to get stuff outside during the day, in April, but the last frost date here is May something or other...(veggie gardens are planted by Memorial weekend)
And the Astilbes are late sprouters here, and mine are just flowering on some...

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by patches1414 on August 20, 2006 08:35 PM
Here in the St. Louis area it's usually late April (4/20 - 4/30) for the last frost date and early to mid-October (10/10 - 10/20) for the first frost date.

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"Lord, I love you and I need you, come into my heart, and bless me, my family, my home, and my friends, in Jesus' name. Amen!"
by merrillzone5 on August 21, 2006 12:51 PM
This is my first year to try Astibles. I planted a total of 6; 3purple and 3 red under a large pear tree along with some other perennials.Plant date6/15/2006. They have been the worst to adapt to this area. I have found that watering the roots vs. the foliage has produced new growth and less burnt leaves. My advice is no sprinkling onto the foliage and hand water with Miracle-Gro into the roots as per their instructions. Good Luck!

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