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container gardening... how big a bucket?

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by Wizzard on December 11, 2005 04:44 AM
well, i like to keep a garden indoors during the winter, but normaly i just grow herbs. they only need a small amount of room, easy care, etc..... anyways, this year i would like to grow a few vegetables, even if only to get a REALY big jump start with some of them. but i need to know how big a bucket i need to put varieties in. i know i could just give everything a 5 gal bucket, but if i know the proper size i will be able to better use the space i have. i wanna grow some salad greens, preferably a "cut and come again" type. and tomato is a must. maybe cucumbers, squash, pole beans. any other random ones i can fit. so does anyone out there know of some sites that would help me out? or do you just know the container sizes for a lot of plants?

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by weezie13 on December 11, 2005 09:37 AM
Wizzard,
I know if you do a FORUM SEARCH and type in
INDOOR GARDENING, I believe you should get some
posts to come up.. we've had some other's doing the same thing for wanting to grow stuff indoors...

Let me see if I can get ahold of "Noneofyourbusiness" and see if he can lend a hand.. he does alot of gardening indoors...

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Wizzard on December 12, 2005 01:56 AM
thanx

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by weezie13 on December 12, 2005 02:01 AM
For the lettuce's you can use something
like a flower box...got it at Wal~Mart, and
had to drill holes in the bottoms though..

*I used it for some Swiss Chard.. this summer,
it didn't quite get as big as the other kind
I had in the raised beds, but I think I over filled it... should have stuck to only about 4 or 6, I put in about 12 plants.. but they still produced for me in that size container...*

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by weezie13 on December 12, 2005 12:29 PM
I also use a 5 Gallon pail for my tomatoes....
I plant deep, so it has a good root system...
put some landscape fabric swatch down on top of
the soil to keep the dirt off of the plant,
stick in a tomato cage... and a stake to keep it
upright, and just water...

I also did some peas in one of those buckets they sell now adays for like an outdoor party filled with like popcans or bottles.. *know idea the size* but I made my own cage for the peas to crawl up, by taking some fencing, and cutting it, and rolling it up in a circle the size of the bucket/container... thru in some dirt, then stuck in the cage thingie and then thru in some more dirt...

Gotta remember about harvesting though...
When the cage is in a circle and the plant grows inside the cage, it's hard to get the produce out
of the middle..
but it worked for me....

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Wizzard on December 12, 2005 09:50 PM
neet. i just looked at your photo bucket, i realy like the climber on the umbrella, how did that work out for you?
i think im gonna grow some pole beans in a 5 gal bucket with some kind of rigged up trellis

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by weezie13 on December 12, 2005 10:55 PM
I got it in late *as per usual for me* [Embarrassed] [Roll Eyes] And at the end of the summer
it was really starting to bloom.
The other two factors that need some adjusting on were....
Problem #1. Size of pots/containers... *funny this should be the one you pick up on, especially asking for container sizes* I put 4 round pots under the feet of the table..*stuff the feet right inside the pot/container* they were only probably 6" or 8" wide...they weren't nearly as big as they needed for the growth of the root systems. I also had one pot/container under the umbrella's pole.. also too small..
I am trying to figure out if I should put 4 taller one's, or say like a window planter...
I am still pondering what to do..
And Problem #2. Was Woodchucks/Groundhogs, whatever anyone would like to call them [Frown] [Razz] [Mad] besides late for dinner on my plants.
Ate them 3 times when I planted them, until I had to find some funny contraptions to put around it and they found some other tid~bit of mine to chew on...Grrrrrrrrrr!!!!!

But it would have looked stunning...

I am working on something to do with ring from that same table and try to grow something that would look like a topiary... but ideas' are abundant, time and $$ and something to implement them are soooooooooo limited, and if my husband isn't receptive, I have to figure it out on my own and sometimes they fall apart.. but hence the learning process is wonderful [tongue]

I can't remember if I have the peas picture in there, it is in the bright blue round bucket with that fencing in a circle.. also did some fencing in half circles' parallel with the ground..

also, if you go to like a Home Depot, I got some 6' tall bamboo stakes.. *I didn't get to use them for my beans, as I never got to planting them..
*I'm slow, children and a mother.. but I am dilagent..*
For outdoor gardening and trellis's we used an old swing set and hung over it one of those netting things you can buy in most catalogs for doing that sort of thing.. I am really liking that fencing stuff I got, it's alot more rigid... and easily bendable and reuseable..
The kind I got said rabbit fencing, but there's more fencing on one side of it, when it's used as it should be, that side is down on the ground and the rabbits can't get thru it cause it's too tight for them...

I also used cloths racks, the kinds in dept. stores, when the store is closing out and getting rid of everything.. and I put over it, some chain link fencing I had sitting around, worked kinda neat for cucumbers...

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by BigBoy on December 13, 2005 04:58 AM
Always disinfect 5 gal. plastic pails before using them and be ready to water the plants everyday in the heat. One nice thing about the pails is if you place them in a child's wagon or some such, you can roll them inside in case of severe weather like hail. Also, drill 3-4 holes in the bottom of the pails to let water out. I've always intended to put a drip system across a row of pails but haven't yet. That would be a good way to provide water to just the roots w/o getting the plants wet- and I could leave town whenever I wish.
I have used half whiskey barrels for tomatoes with limited success. One needs to clean them well (tough to do) and replace the dirt each season to prevent tomato diseases. That's a lot of dirt to buy or move.
As Weezie said, it's difficult to find good soil to truck in. Lots comes from poor areas to begin with.
by weezie13 on December 13, 2005 05:06 AM
Hiya Bigboy!!!! [wavey] [flower]

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by BigBoy on December 14, 2005 11:34 AM
Hi Weezie. Hope you are well. [Smile]
by noneofyourbusiness on December 16, 2005 01:00 PM
You'll be fine using 5 gallon buckets. YOu could even go with 12 gallons for the lettuce. Just keep an eye on the roots. If the dirt gets tight, or roots start comming out of th ebottom of the planter, transplant it.
Growing indoors is fun!
by Sorellina on December 17, 2005 12:23 AM
Ciao Wizard,

I know absolutely nothing about indoor plants, vegetables or otherwise, unless it's growing seedlings for Spring planting.

That being said, I do know a thing or two about tomato growing and I can tell you that if you're going to attempt to grow an "indeterminate" tomato plant or one that continues to grow until it dies, a 5 gallon capacity bucket is not going to work. You'd do better by either growing only dwarf tomato varieties and I can help you with choosing a few good ones, or growing the monsters in 15 gallons. Otherwise, you'll find that your plants will be root-bound and won't give you the harvest you want.

Buona fortuna,
Julianna

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by Triss on December 17, 2005 02:53 AM
Jumping in late on this one. If you want to do peppers indoors, they are great for that. I have done them in 5 gallon buckets and had great success.

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We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
by Wizzard on December 20, 2005 10:21 AM
so, i was out of town for a bit. thanx for the replies. about the tomatoes, if i grow a tomato plant in a 5 gal bucket how much would it stunt the production? we only eat about 3-5 tomatoes a month, would it be able to produce that? if not, what do you all think about using the sterilite tupperware totes from walmart for a planter? i dont know the size, but i would estimate 10-20 gallons. i would have to put holes in the bottom, but other than that do you think it would work ok?

another thing i was wondering about is, i would like to grow a few fruit plants like blueberry and blackberry, would a sterilite tote work for that? is 15 gallon big enough?

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by Triss on December 20, 2005 10:38 AM
Cannot answer those questions, but I do have one for you. How are you planning on pollenating everything so that is bears produce, fruit, flowers, etc?

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We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.
by Wizzard on December 22, 2005 12:46 AM
hand pollination... small paintbrush

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by Triss on December 22, 2005 03:42 AM
I thought that may be the case, but wanted to check to be sure.

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by beebiz on December 23, 2005 06:16 PM
Hey Wizzard,

I just noticed that you are from Murray, KY. We are practically neighbors!! My wife and I live in McKenzie, TN; about 30 miles south of Paris, TN! Howdie neighbor!!

I don't know how they would do the rest of the year, but if you are talking about growing fruits in a container during the winter months, it probably won't work very well. Most of your fruit bearing plants need the dormancy of the winter in order to produce their fruit crops. Some even need a certain number of chilling hours (furnished by Mother Nature) in order to fruit.

As for pollinating your plants, be very careful using a paint brush to pollinate your tomatoes. It is very easy to damage the flower sets and cause them to drop off or form deformed fruits. A much better choice to pollinate tomatoes is a vibrating device. Some greenhouse supply companies sell devices that are made especially for doing this. If you will go to this page at hydrogardens.com and scroll down a little over half way, you will find the Pollinator II. It is only $15.95, runs off of a AA battery and may help you to keep from damaging your flower sets.

Some folks use old electric toothbrushes or other vibrating devices that they have made from old telephones and doorbells. There are even some folks who will just grasp the tomato's stake or line and gently shake it to dislodge the pollen. However you decide to pollinate them, don't touch the blooms of the tomato plants. Again, they are very easily damaged. If you use a vibrating device, just touch where the flower set joins the main stem and vibrate for a couple of seconds.

Also, when hand pollinating your tomatoes, it is best to do it between 11 AM and 2 PM. This is the time of day that the humidity is usually the lowest. This needs to be done at least three times per week. On days when the humidity is very high around your tomatoes, you are literally wasting your time to try to hand pollinate them. The high humidity causes the pollen to clump together and it does not move or fertilize very well.

Wizzard, I hope this helps you out. I'd sure like to see what your container garden looks like when you get it going.

Robert

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My New Web Site If you take a look, please sign my guest book so I'll know you've been there! Also, check out the new African Violet addition to my site! Thanks
by Wizzard on December 24, 2005 02:47 AM
hi neighbor. nah, the fruit isnt for this winter, its for spring. i live in an apartment where the chances of a garden are slim. however if i can put it in containers, it will be moveable. the landlord will not mind that, and i get to take my plants with me if i move. still intended to let most of the fruit plants die back in the winter (prolly bring about 4 strawberry plants in). my only concern is whether the size of the container is big enough to grow fruit in.
thanx for the info on hand pollinating, i had no idea what i was doing, would have prolly destroyed a lot of fruit capability. thanx again

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by beebiz on December 24, 2005 02:00 PM
Wizzard, I am soooo sorry. I feel like I let you down. I went back and read your last post on page one and for some reason, your questions "sank in" a bit better.

There are lots of people who grow tomato plants in 5 gallon gallon buckets and do so with great success. Just make sure that you find a happy medium between soil that is too wet and soil that is too dry. Remember that when it comes to tomatoes, lighter and more frequent waterings are better than heavy, infrequent waterings. Over watering or long times devoid of water followed by heavy waterings can cause lots of problems... namely blossom end rot. Also, when you water them, try to get as little water on the plant as possible. The water won't hurt the plant (unless you are using a hevily clorinated city water), but wetting the leaves of the plant always invites problems with diseases.

Also, are you planning on growing determinate or indeterminate plants? The det. make a bushy plant, but tend to yeild most of their tomatoes all at once. The indet. can grow very tall vines and must be steaked or trellised. But, they tend to produce tomatoes right up until frost.

There is a tomato that is produced especially for container raised tomatoes. I don't remember the name of them right off hand, but if you are interested in them, let me know and I will find out which ones they are and where you can get some.

As for growing the blackberries or blueberries in containers, I don't know about that. Given your location, my knee jerk reaction is that in such shallow containers their might be a danger of the entire root ball freezing. I don't know if this would kill/damage them or not. But, I will do my best to see what I can find out for you (about container size and freezing). It will probably take me a few days, but don't give me out!! I need to know something else though. Are you talking about keeping them outside on a balcony or deck or are you talking about keeping them inside your apartment?

Talk to ya later neighbor,
Robert

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My New Web Site If you take a look, please sign my guest book so I'll know you've been there! Also, check out the new African Violet addition to my site! Thanks
by tkhooper on December 24, 2005 08:22 PM
could you find out the name of the determinate/bush tomato plants for me please. That would be so much easier to deal with. I too live in an apartment....a small apartment.

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by Wizzard on December 25, 2005 01:10 AM
the fruits will be grown outdoors.the "apartment" is more a quad-plex. so im on the ground floor, im just not allowed to dig. but they said containers were ok... so no problem with room in the apartment.
the tomato... im pretty sure its the bigger of the lot... rutgers select. if it gets higher than the ceiling, i will have to trim it, but im going to move it outside after frost is no longer an issue... how tall it will get before then i do not know [grin] but thats half the fun i guess. i have already started a few pole beans for a 5 gal bucket, there almost a foot tall already.

the blackberries and whatnot... the freezing was something i was woried about also. i have been trying to think of a way to overcome it, however the only thing i have been able to come up with is placing them all in a small area together, with hay in between and perhaps a blanket and or tarp on the outside. dont know if that will work or not... any thoughts?

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by beebiz on December 26, 2005 12:48 PM
Okay, I'm still new to this forum and you guys have put me to work!! I love it!!! [tongue]

TK, I'll answer your question first because it is the easiest. There are several tomatoes that are determinate tomatoes. The one that I was thinking about that was bred especially for containers is called Tomato Container Choice Hybrid. As its name indicates, it is a hybrid tomato. Though they are compact plants, Park Seed Co. says that they produce 8 oz. fruits! Pretty good for a compact size plant! If you are interested in them, you can find them by clicking here. If you are wanting to stay with an open pollinated or heirloom variety, you can click here to see Victory Seeds' list of tomatoes. Whether they are determinate or indeterminate is specified.

Since you and Wizzard live in appartments, I thought you might be interested in another tomato that I know about. It's called Tumbling Tom. It was bred to be grown in a hanging basket. You set 2-3 in an 8-10" hanging basket and they "spill" over the sides much like a petunia. The tomatoes are only 1-2" around, but they are great for a snack or in salads!

Alright Wizzard, your turn!! [Smile]

When I would think about you growing blueberries in containers, I felt as though I had something gnawing at the back of my brain! At first, I thought it was a flea! But, it turns out that somewhere in my memory there was information about a blueberry that has been bred to grow in containers. But, I couldn't remember any more than that.

Tonight, I finally remembered enough about them to find them for you. They are called Top Hat Blueberries. They were specifically grown for containers/flower pots. So, a 5-gallon bucket should work fine. They only grow about 24" tall, produce full sized 1/2" berries, and turn a beautiful firey red in the Autumn. The plants look small beside their full-sized cousins, but they produce blueberries like they were going out of style!! And, they are good too!

The way I found out about them is that a guy that I knew about 6 years ago had two of them on his back deck. When I visited him last, they had a world of ripe blueberries on them, so I tried one. They were wonderful. I asked him why he hadn't picked them and he said that he just grew them for the birds!!

Although these little guys are easier to grow than their full-sized cousins, you need to try to maintain a pH range of between 4.0 and 5.0. Also, although blueberries and blackberries love very moist soil... not wet, but very moist soil they demand good drainage. And as far as the freezing is concerned, I believe that I would insulate them for the winter as you described.

Since you will be growing them outside, don't forget to put bird netting over them or you won't have any blueberries!! Birds are pretty smart little critters. If you leave a way for them to do so, they will even crawl underneath the netting to get to the blueberries. If you are interested in the Top Hat Blueberries, you can find them at Gardener's Choice by clicking here. I thought they were very reasonable... only $8.95 for 2 plants.

As for the blackberries, all I have been able to find out is that they will probably do alright in containers. I don't know of any type that has been bred specifically for containers though. Were it me and I wanted to try some, I would put them in 5-gallon buckets and protect them in the winter like I would the blueberries. Also, don't forget to protect the fruit from the neighborhood birds. They love them just like blueberries!

Here are a few other things to consider or keep in mind about them. Unlike the blueberries, blackberries like a sweet soil. A pH range of 5.5 to 7.0 should do nicely. Especially by them being grown in containers that you will probably have to move at some point, I would strongly consider the thornless varieties! They are usually not as sweet, but they don't bite!! [thumb] Blackberries produce their fruit on the 2 year-old canes. The older canes produce little to no fruit So, they need to be pruned to help them produce more fruit. And if you don't prune them, you will soon have a bramble patch instead of a blackberry patch! [Eek!] You can find information about pruning from the LSU AgCenter here. Some more pruning info here. You can find more indepth information by doing a Google search for "pruning blackberries" or "growing blackberries."

Well, that's about it for now. I hope this isn't so long that it blows the server when I try to post it!! [Wink] Good luck with your container garden and berry patch. If there is anything else I can help you with, I'll be glad to try!!

Robert

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My New Web Site If you take a look, please sign my guest book so I'll know you've been there! Also, check out the new African Violet addition to my site! Thanks
by tkhooper on December 26, 2005 02:23 PM
Thankyou Robert,

I appreciate all the information. This is going to help alot.

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by beebiz on December 26, 2005 05:02 PM
Glad to be of assistance tk.

Robert

* * * *
My New Web Site If you take a look, please sign my guest book so I'll know you've been there! Also, check out the new African Violet addition to my site! Thanks
by glenskinz on December 27, 2005 04:01 AM
Those rubber maid totes would work great just be sure to drill a million holes in the bottom and use plenty of pearlite in your mix. I have all my plants in 3 or 5 gallon nursery pots they could use alot bigger pots but i got about a dozen or so tomatoes out of 6 tomatoes planted this way and about a dozen more coming so i say you can do it you just have to feed them all the time with water soluble fertilizer
by comfrey on December 27, 2005 01:40 PM
Just a tip on those nursery pots...First of all if you contact a landscaper they may give some of these pots for free....as most of them that don't grow their own plants just throw the pots away...I have a whole shed full that I got for free that way. Also with the nursery pots since they have all those drainage holes, I have found it necessary to put duck tape over some of the holes, so all the water doesn't just drain strait through the pots. I have grown tomatoes, peppers & cucumbers in these pots and also in the 3 and 5 gallon buckets. The full sized tomato plants or indeterminate type work fine, they just require you place a stake in the pot, I do this early, so the stake is all the way to the bottom of the bucket or pot and doesn't disturb the root growth.

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by Wizzard on December 27, 2005 02:07 PM
im planning on putting the tomato in a 5 gal bucket with holes in the bottom, i supose when i finaly put it in the big container i should make a trellise for it first to put in the bucket before dirt. i have plenty of bamboo, so i can make it outta that.
on the blackberries... im going to go ahead and try to grow them in the container as sort of an "experiment" i supose [Wink] (wife = the forum realy needs to know if this will work or not honey) [Wink] hopefuly it will be a good venture. as for overwintering them... im still looking for a better way, i may have to cut them back, put the lids on the totes and stack them in a closet somewhere.
on a new subject... i have been considering growing strawberries in a kiddie pool. digging them up in the fall for frost protection. also thought about making a 12 inch deep planter 5 ft by 8 ft on a spare trailer frame i have so i could plant some vegies... so enough rambling already, im just dreaming of spring i guess [grin]

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by nate_o23 on December 31, 2005 10:43 AM
OK I am a rank newbie so bear with my beginner question. I noticed earlier in this post that someone mentioned hand pollinating with a small brush. The reason I ask is I have a tomato plant in a 5 gal bucket growing indoors. The plant is pretty big and has some flowers but no tomatos. Should I be pollinating the flowers?? If so how?? Thanks for any help
by beebiz on December 31, 2005 01:54 PM
Hello nate and welcome to our little neck of the web!

When tomatoes are outside, they are predominately pollinated by the wind. When it blows, it shakes the plant and flowers which breaks the pollen loose and allows it to do its job. Tomatoes which are grown inside are not exposed to the wind and therefore cannot pollinate themselves. They have to have help.

The best thing that I know of to use is a tool which is especially made for the job. It is simply called Tomato Pollinator, and cost $15.95 from Hydro-Gardens. It can be found by clicking here and scrolling about halfway down the page.

The next best thing that I know of is an old electric toothbrush. With either tool, it is placed against the flower set where it joins the main stem and then vibrated for 2 or 3 seconds. If you use an electric toothbrush, dont' use the bristles of the brush to do this. You will damage the stem.

Another way to pollinate them is to grasp the stake or cage that supports the tomato plant and shake it. But, don't shake it violently. You'll damage the plant! Shake it as if the plant has a dusty or powdery substance on it that you are trying to gently dislodge and that should be sufficient.

Whichever way you do it, the manual pollination of the flowers needs to be done every time you find a new flower set whose flowers have opened. After you have pollinated that one, you can mark it by tying a string or piece of bright thread LOOSELY around the base of the flower set's stem. Then, you can easily tell if you are looking at a flower set that has been pollinated or at a new one. And, it is best to do your manual pollination between 11 AM and 2 PM. This is the time of day when the humidity is usually at its lowest and pollination works best.

I have known of some people who used small paint brushes to manually pollinate their tomatoes. But, I do not recommend this... especially to newbies. The flower sets are very easily damaged with brushes or with your fingers. So never, never touch one of the flowers with your fingers!

I hope this helps you out. If I can help further, please don't hesitate to ask!

Happy New Year,
Robert

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My New Web Site If you take a look, please sign my guest book so I'll know you've been there! Also, check out the new African Violet addition to my site! Thanks
by Sorellina on January 04, 2006 01:45 AM
Wizzard,

Any plastic container will work. Use a drill bit no smaller than 1cm to make your holes, the better the drainage, the better, no need to put rocks or pebbles in the bottom if you're using a good soilless mix like Pro-mix. I've grown tomatoes in plastic cat litter containers and protein powder containers in the past, it's no biggie as long as you "sterilize" the ones you're recycling with a dilute bleach solution first, rinsing it well afterwards.

If you grow in a container that is too small, what will happen is that the roots will fill up that container and deplete the nutrients of the soil very rapidly and you'll have to water very very often, even inside because of the dry conditions that exist indoors. Do yourself and your plants a favour and use larger containers.

Tomatoes, in case you don't know this, are self-pollinators, but when grown outside, they get the benefit of breezes which carry pollen almost as efficiently as the bees do. You can facilitate this by either leaving a fan close to the plants or shaking them (gently) manually each day. If you're planning on saving seeds, however, you'll want to either grow only one variety or cover the blossoms so they don't get cross-pollinated and you'll have to shake those blossoms yourself.

Buona fortuna,
Julianna

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by Sorellina on January 04, 2006 01:49 AM
I'm such a spaz and didn't see the replies to this post on the other 2 pages until just now so forgive me for any redundancy! It's not my nature to be patronizing, honest ;o)

Julianna

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by comfrey on January 06, 2006 09:13 AM
Of course it depends on the type of tomato you are planting, but in a 5 gallon bucket you should get more then what you require for the month. The harvest is alittle smaller and the tomatoes could be alittle smaller also then if planted directly into the ground...but not to a point of it making a big difference.

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by Wizzard on January 07, 2006 10:59 PM
well, the tomato plant is about 4 inches tall now. im probably going to move it to the 5 gal bucket in about a week. im using a mix of miracle grow, peat moss, and some crappy potting soil.

on the berries. i talked to my sister yesterday, she said she has been growing a raspberry plant in a 6 gal flower pot for 3 years now. she leaves it outside in the winter in zone 6. it has been producing every year. she said it had a little problems this year b-cause it was so dry, but other than that its doing fine.
so i figure i will give mine a bit more room, and plant maybe 2 plants in an 18 gal tote.

thanx for all the replies.

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by Triss on January 08, 2006 03:00 AM
That is exciting about the berries. Do you know if she prunes it back every year? Raspberries can get pretty wild, can't they?

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by Wizzard on January 09, 2006 01:32 AM
she said she pruned it this year, but the last 2 years she hasnt. said that the stems just basicaly fell over as the new ones grew in. i figure with pruning, they would probably produce a bit more though, so i intend to cut mine off at soil level every year come winter. its nice to know i dont have to do anything special to overwinter them. i was realy worried that they would die if they froze solid. although, her plant is a thorn plant and i was going for thornless, so they may be less hardy.... not sure, we will see though.

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by Triss on January 09, 2006 05:17 AM
I am pretty sure we have wild berries of some sort growing across the road. If so I will be looking to snag some to grow. Going to do them in a container as well as that sounds like the best way to keep them in check.

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by Wizzard on January 09, 2006 05:21 AM
i intend to grow some blackberries as well, i know they will spread rampantly. im not sure about raspberries. but either way, they wont be a problem in a planter. good luck with yours, hope all goes well

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by Triss on January 09, 2006 05:46 AM
And with yours too!

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We are all under the same stars... therefore we are never far apart.

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