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Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2005
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by McNotashark on October 30, 2005 01:23 AM
Hello all,

I am looking for house plants that originate in North America. I don't like the idea of having tropical plants in my house, I would like to reflect where I am and where I come from in the decor of my house. African violets, palm trees and tropical plants like that just don't reflect that. Does any one know of any "domestic" house plants? Or a website that lists where specific house plants originated?

Thank you

McNotashark
by Jiffymouse on October 30, 2005 06:38 AM
no clue, but i have a very good book i will consult and get back to you!
by Cricket on October 30, 2005 07:26 AM
The term "houseplant" simply refers to any plant that is kept indoors. Obviously, all plants have their origin in nature (even greenhouse cultivated hybrids trace their genetic ancestry to plants that grow wild somewhere). The key to keeping any plant indoors is the ability to provide them with an environment suitable to their individual requirements and most plants have a range of conditions they will tolerate. Light is the most important factor. Remember that most homes cannot provide optimum light for plants that require full sunlight. Many of the tropical plants we keep indoors grow under the canopy of taller trees which protect them from the full force of the sun, making them more suitable for indoors lighting conditions. Lots of plants will survive under less than ideal conditions but the closer we can mimic any plant's natural habitat the greater chance it will thrive.

I can't advise specifically which plants to try (someone else might have more information about that) but a little research and experimentation should produce interesting results. You might want to experiement by collecting specimens of native plant species after observing their natural habitat such as how much light they receive and whether it is direct or indirect sunlight, how moist the soil in which they grow, what kind of plants grow near them, size, and anything else you notice. I think your goal is worth pursuing and I hope you keep us posted as you progress. Lots of us will be eager to learn from you!

Cricket
by cLoud[GLPong] on October 30, 2005 09:17 AM
sorry if this sounds condecending I dont mean for it to be but theres no better way for me to put this.. have you tried google? the first result I got was for this site http://www.nanps.org/index.shtml
which has a decent list maybe try here.. I cant think of any plants in my area that can be grown indoors that are native to n.america... well... i can but your not allowed to grow them for obvious legal reasons...

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by tkhooper on October 30, 2005 09:33 AM
Cactus are the first thing that comes to mind. But becareful because some are endangered. Next question is do you include naturalized plants? Those that came over from elsewhere and have gone native so to speak. If so it will probably add to your possibilities. Corn is a North american plant I think and I know one of our members grows it inside with special lighting. That's all I can think of right now. I'm a new gardener so I don't know a whole lot.

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by Cricket on October 30, 2005 11:21 AM
Another consideration I neglected to mention is temperature. Whereas tropical plants grow in regions where year-round temperatures are similar to those found in our homes, most species native to northern climes such as Canada require colder temperatures in the winter, severely limiting the number of native species suitable as houseplants.
by tkhooper on October 31, 2005 01:02 AM
Here's another one for you that will work as a house plant and is found in the south west spikemoss. And some of it is really cool. I want to get some in the future. But I have to kind of rearrange myself first lol. What we won't do for our plants.

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by cLoud[GLPong] on November 01, 2005 08:43 AM
FERNS!!! there are more ferns in the lower mainland than anything i can think of... certain varieties or ivy as well are native to n.america.. i'm in vancouver so my plants will differ from yours... just a thought...

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- "i love this show!" - G.I.R.
by Patty S on November 02, 2005 12:30 AM
Wandering Jew (Tradescantia fluminensis) & Pothos (Scindapsus aureus, AKA Devils Ivy) are probably among the most popular indoor plants anywhere. They'll both spread out & trail if you let them (Look great on top of a piano/china hutch/buffet cabinet), or can be trained on a stake, or will even do fine in a pretty water jar. Probably the reason they're so popular is because they're very hardy & low maintenence. Spider Plants are another favorite, & look "American" enough to me! While they may not have originated in N America, they're so common that they might as well be from here, so I don't think you could go wrong with them!

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by RugbyHukr on November 02, 2005 01:51 AM
Technically, not alot of our plants are "native". Apple trees are not native to North America. You might be surprised.

Forget native only. It will only limit you. Celebrate nature & enjoy.

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by Erich on November 02, 2005 12:36 PM
There are really not many plants native to your area that would make suitable houseplants. However, if you want some attractive plants to provide your house with an eclectic atmosphere, then these might suit you. Cacti and succulents are a favorite of mine and require minimal care. Sedum morganianum (burro's tail) are simply gorgeous. I would also recommend spider plants because they are simply awesome - especially when they produce babies. I know you said you didn't wnat any tropical plants, but "air plants" are great conversation pieces and look cool too.

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