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by BFVISION on March 30, 2004 03:38 AM
I started a purple beauty last year in full sunshine. What do I need to do to insure the return is even better? [dunno]

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BFVISION

http://www.imagestation.com/album/?id=2122269418&mode=guest
by alankhart on March 30, 2004 03:57 PM
One of the most important things to know about clematis is that they like cool roots, so mulch and maybe plant something around it to keep the roots from being in direct sun. Depending on which type it is, you can either trim it back to the bud at ground level or only back to the last bud along the stems...you'll need to check if it's a type 1, 2 or 3.

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by Bess of the Piedmont on March 30, 2004 06:24 PM
How do we check that, Alan?

I have a few kinds of clematis. I have a Jackmanii that took several years to get to full blooming capacity. I had to be patient with it, but it's lovely, now. I have two of the larger flat-petaled sort, which were rescued (with permission, of course) from a yard that was being rennovated. I can't quite identify them. They may be a cross between Nellie moser and something else. They are a mauve color with gold stamens. I have been nursing them along for a while, and I'm sure they'll hit the fabulous stage this year or next.

I also have sweet autumn clematis, which seems to grow everywhere.

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by BFVISION on March 31, 2004 02:23 AM
[Big Grin] [Big Grin] 1,2 OR 3? [shocked] All I know is it was small, fragile, had beautiful blue flowers that I was attempting to train around my mailbox. I know all about the cool roots full sun gig, but how do I figure out if it gets a trim or not [dunno] ? I will say it looks [scaredy] dead, but I am hoping it is the type that starts over new. Any thoughts?

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BFVISION

http://www.imagestation.com/album/?id=2122269418&mode=guest
by Bess of the Piedmont on March 31, 2004 04:57 PM
1, 2 or 3!?! Sounds like the Dating Game!

Don't worry about the dead look. Most Clematis look stone dead and dry as rope at this time of year. Mine are just starting to show signs of life on the twigs, so if you're up in Jersey, you may have a couple of weeks to wait.

My husband habitually hacked off what he felt was the obviously dead top stem for years and you know what? It didn't seem to make any difference. The thing just started up again from the ground. May the pros correct me, but I believe that the real life is all in the root system. The bigger the root system, the more the stem system will grow, whether it's pruned or not. But that may differ among 1, 2 and 3.

I guess I'll go with bachelor #1.

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by barbi on March 31, 2004 08:44 PM
[flower] You should be able to find answers here... http://clematis.org/home.html

I grow the evergreen clematis.. [Smile]

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"To cultivate a garden and grow flowers from the sod is to go hand and hand with nature and walk very close to God.
Helen Steiner-Rice
by alankhart on March 31, 2004 11:47 PM
Group A: Early-flowering Clematis

Plants in this group bloom in early spring, generally in April and May, from buds produced the previous season. Prune these plants immediately after flowering, but no later than the end of July. This allows time for new growth to produce flower buds for the next season. Remove shoots that have bloomed. You can prune out more vines to reduce the size or to form a good framework of branches, but avoid cutting into woody trunks. Plants in this group include: C. alpina, C. macropetala, C. armandii, C. montana and C. chrysocoma.

Group B: Large-flowered Hybrids

Large-flowered hybrids bloom in mid-June on short stems from the previous season's growth and often again in late summer on new growth, though these blooms are usually smaller. Prune in February or March by removing dead and weak stems, then cut back the remaining stems to the topmost pair of large, plump green buds. This cut could be a 6 inches to 18 inches from the stem tips. Plants in this group have the tendency to become leafless at the base as they mature. You can underplant with low, spreading perennials to help conceal the stems. You may be able to force a flush of new growth from the base by cutting the vine back to 18 inches immediately after the flush of bloom in June. Plants in this group include: 'Nelly Moser,' 'Miss Bateman,' 'Lasurstern,' 'Duchess of Edinburgh,' 'Mrs. Cholmondeley' and others.

Group C: Late-flowering Clematis

Plants in this group flower on the last 24-36 inches of the current season's growth. Some types begin blooming in mid-June and continue into the fall. This is the easiest group to prune since no old wood needs to be maintained. In February or March cut each stem to a height of about 24-36 inches. This will include removal of some good stems and buds. Eventually the length of the bare stem at the base will increase as the vine matures. Plants in this group include: C. viticella, C. flammula, C. tangutica, C. x jackmanii, C. maximowicziana, 'Perle d'Azur,' 'Royal Velours,' 'Duchess of Albany' and others.

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by Storm on April 03, 2004 05:38 AM
Thanks for all the wonderful advice. I did it. I pruned my clematis down to 3 feet. Broke my heart but we will see how they do.

My climber(on my arbour) is bursting with buds. [Smile]
by Bestofour on April 05, 2004 02:08 AM
Last year I bought two clematis from a very reputible garden shop. I told him I needed something for an almost entirely shady area with a fence. He suggested that I buy these. They have not done well and everything I've read said they need a lot of light and some sun. Did he lie to me? I buy a lot of stuff at this place and if I find out this is true, I'm going back and beat him up. Well, maybe not beat him up, but I'm certainly going to have a chat with him. By him, I mean the owner.

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by weezie13 on April 05, 2004 02:51 AM
Bestofour,
Clematis's like their feet in the shade or cooler area,
and their leaves/flowers/faces the sun!!!

Go back and beat him up for all of us!!

(* I am just kidding **)
(****I had a bad weekend with a car inspector place,
I'd like beat 'em all up!!! When they fib to a person, or don't tell the whole story*)

I'd go back and just ask him why he would suggest that, just out of curiousity??
Print this up, all the info the previous gardeners posted to you and see what he has to say when it's written down in plain english....
Hey, you never know?? He might refund something or give you a percentage off if he's smart???

Weezie

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Ogi on April 06, 2004 11:03 AM
Hi,

Clematis are difficult to grow, however, like any other plant, if their needs can be met by the site and proper care, they will thrive. Clematis require full sun to grow best.

Here is 2 very useful links about Clematis - Growing, Propagation, Transplanting, Pruning, Problems

http://www.e-calc.net/articles.php?mart=67&tid=3693

http://www.e-calc.net/articles.php?mart=67&tid=3215

Good luck!

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