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Bells of Ireland

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2006
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by peppereater on February 15, 2006 09:02 AM
I did a Google image search for Bells of Ireland, and got several different-looking images. Some looked like Hollyhocks...
I thought this was a floral item or a houseplant...
Does anyone know if this is a common name aplied to different species? [dunno]

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Dave
Even my growlights are getting restless!
by Bestofour on February 15, 2006 09:06 AM
I've always thought Bells of Ireland are green stem like things that can be grown at home, outside, and used in floral arrangements. The stems have bell shaped things on them that are green too.

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by weezie13 on February 15, 2006 11:01 PM
Here's a couple of images of them..
Bells of Ireland

Sheri pretty much discribed them, I think!!!

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by peppereater on February 15, 2006 11:01 PM
I've only seen them in floral arrangements, and I'd love to grow them. They're a great shade of green.
I'm going to research this and post what I find... [thumb]

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Dave
Even my growlights are getting restless!
by peppereater on February 15, 2006 11:08 PM
Weezie...that's the page I got when I Googled...I guess they're all images of the same thing, but they seem to vary some.
I'm definitely going to try growing them this year! [thumb]

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Dave
Even my growlights are getting restless!
by weezie13 on February 15, 2006 11:21 PM
They are tricky to get started..
You have to put them in the cold first,
and I know we started a post on them, just recently, do a FORUM SEARCH, and type in the BELLS OF IRELAND, and see what comes up,
Patty and I and a few others' were talking about them..there's some good info on that post..

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/
by Patty S on February 16, 2006 01:20 AM
Last year, after waiting for 6 weeks for them to germinate & then only getting about a 10% yield from the seeds I'd planted, I learned two important things about germinating Bells of Ireland seeds:

The first was, as Weezie mentioned, that they need to be Stratified (cold treated)... which I simply don't trust that the Seed Companies do, as that requirement doesn't seem to be mentioned on any seed packets I've seen, so I do it myself by placing the seed packet in the refrigerator. (I never looked up how long they need to be in the cold. I just left them in the refrigerator till I got around to playing with them, which turned out to be a month.)

The second major requirement is that the seeds need to be exposed to light, in order to germinate. (DO NOT cover the seeds with soil, as they'll "dig in" by themselves.)

I recently did an experiment with my Bells of Ireland seeds. I took an equal number of seeds & put them in four groups.
Group 1, I soaked overnight.
Group 2, I Scarified by rubbing the tips on sandpaper. (The seeds are shaped like little pyramids.)
Group 3, I Scarified AND soaked.
Group 4, I left alone.

I planted all 4 groups on the same day, by just placing them on top of the soil.

ALL FOUR GROUPS SPROUTED 5 days later! (Oh well... now I know that the secret to successfully germinating Bells of Ireland seeds involves ONLY Stratification & light!)

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by peppereater on February 16, 2006 07:15 AM
Great info., Patty! The only thing I'd read was to sew outside in early summer.

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Dave
Even my growlights are getting restless!
by Bestofour on February 16, 2006 09:54 AM
Where did you get your seeds?

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by Patty S on February 16, 2006 04:05 PM
quote:
The only thing I'd read was to sew outside in early summer.
Dave, as much as we pay for a packet of (so few) seeds these days, it really gripes me when instructions are so drastically inaccurate that not only don't we get our dollar value, but are robbed of the satisfaction that should come from planting seeds & having them produce! (If information about a particular plant/seed can't be found here on this Web site, I'd trust any of the State Extension sites before relying on germination/propagation information found on seed packets, or anywhere else!)

I haven't seen the correct information printed on any of the Bells of Ireland seed packets I've seen in the stores, & I also enlarged the pic of the seed packet on the page that Weezie posted up ^ there... The planting instructions on that one say, "Cover 1/2 inch deep", WHICH IS TOTALLY WRONG! (That's why it took my seeds so long to sprout last year, & as I said earlier, about 90% of what I planted, didn't!)

I have a good mind to write to a few seed companies! If printing innacurate or misleading information on their packets is their way of suckering people into buying more seeds, they're shooting themselves in the foot with such poor Marketing, as it's not a very good way to build a good reputation with consumers!

Sheri, last year I bought "WalMart Gardens" brand (packaged by MK Lawn & Garden Co.) & this year I bought Burpee seeds... & the planting directions on both brands DO NOT stipulate that there is a light requirement for germination, but the Burpee seeds DO offer a "Garden Hint", that to aid germination the seeds should be chilled for 5 days or soaked in warm water. (Again, I found no difference in germination time after soaking.)

I used the store-bought seeds for my experiment, because I want to use the ones that I harvested from my (few) plants last year, to sew directly into the garden. (One of the reasons I did my experiment was to calculate germination time, so I'd know when to plant them outside.)

Being a newbie at flower gardening & trying only to grow Bells of Ireland last year (& failing at it), I very well could have been discouraged from attempting flower gardening altogether, if it weren't for my curiosity, which led me to this site. I STRONGLY urge everyone to do some research (or ask questions here) before planting commercial seeds, in order to verify the information printed on packets!

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by peppereater on February 16, 2006 11:43 PM
Patty...I know exactly what you mean about instructions. I've noticed that some brands of seed have exactly the same planting instructions on every variety of seed. The print the backs alike, and only change the printing plates for the front of the pack! [nutz] [devil]

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Dave
Even my growlights are getting restless!
by Bestofour on February 17, 2006 09:26 AM
I've noticed that too. How can they get away with it?

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by tkhooper on February 17, 2006 09:50 PM
As long as people buy the product they have no incentive to change.

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by Patty S on February 22, 2006 02:51 PM
quote:
As long as people buy the product they have no incentive to change.
EXACTLY!

...and, I don't think that omitting information on something like garden seeds carries any liability for the Companies, such as are within the guidelines of "false advertising" or other product disclosures, which may bring harm to the consumer.

The buyer simply assumes that THEY did something wrong & returns to buy another packet of seeds (...& ends up thinking, "I'm just no good at growing that particular plant"!)

It is, indeed, poor marketing practice when viewed from a Pubic Relations standpoint, & could (does) tarnish a seed company's image in the eyes of consumers who have done their homework! Apparently, there isn't much financial impact showing on their books from decreased sales volume, to change their ways, so they just don't need to bother with investing in new (& informational) packaging! [dunno]

(Some things just aren't "fair" in this world... I only wish those things were limited to garden seed packet information!)
Do your homework (or keep reading & asking questions around here) & HAPPY GARDENING!) [flower]

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by dodge on February 24, 2006 09:30 AM
Speakin of Bells of Ireland.
[Embarrassed]
Mine germinated inside with just my heating cable. Never did it before.. first time.
[angel]
i did cover them.
Now I will cross my fingers..However I gave up on Pansies , they need stratification. Seed companys just do assembly line stuff, Do not check it all. especially the the cheap seeds.
[flower]
I a pleased with seed swaps.
[Love] [Love]
Dodge

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''''Those who live in the Lord Never See Each Other For The Last Time!''''
by weezie13 on February 24, 2006 10:10 AM
Hey Dodge,
quote:
However I gave up on Pansies
Got a question for youuuuu...
Did you put the pansies seeds on the heating pad when you were tryin' to do those??

Pansy's love cooooooool temps...
Might be it... [dunno]

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Weezie

Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have
done this have entertained angels without realizing it.
- Bible - Hebrews 13:2

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http://photobucket.com/albums/y250/weezie13/

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