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wood ash

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by Cricket on March 26, 2005 06:53 AM
How much ash would a wood ash ash if a wood ash would ash wood?

Okay, now that's out of my system [nutz] , how much wood ash should I add to potting soil when I repot some houseplants? And what does ash do to the pH of soil?
by Amy R. on March 26, 2005 08:09 AM
Hey Cricket, check this out:

"Wood ash is the only acceptable additive to indoor plants on the list. Wood ash is a good source of potash and adds texture to plant soil."

That's from a super cool site, but I shan't hot link it here. It's the least I can do for Bill, since I routinely spam his site with my silliness. [Embarrassed]
Holy moley, is potash potassium? My word! And that's about where my "knowledge" ends.
Good luck in your quest, young warrior princess. [Wink]
by Cricket on March 26, 2005 08:16 AM
Thanks, Amy! [wayey]

I read that (probably the same place you did [Big Grin] ). That's how the question was raised for me. Now, some of my plants are beginning to whisper in my ear, "Cricket...hey, Cricket...Cricket!.... CRICKET! Listen up! Spring is here and we want new homes!"

This not-so-gentle reminder alerted me to my ignorance of how much is too much or not enough, and living with attitudal plants, I don't dare screw up! [scaredy]

Hey, Fearless Gardenia Bud Buster Amy, I dreamt this thread months ago!
by Sheri&Kiki on March 26, 2005 08:49 AM
Just thought of something I saw here about adding banana peels into the soil. It's probably somewhere in the archives......??
And speaking of gardenias, I could have sworn I saw the tiny beginnings of new growth on the spindly mystery gardenia...dare I hope? [grin]

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by Cricket on March 26, 2005 09:37 AM
quote:
And speaking of gardenias, I could have sworn I saw the tiny beginnings of new growth on the spindly mystery gardenia
[thumb] You're like a gardenia-savior! [grin]
by Sheri&Kiki on March 26, 2005 09:53 AM
Not really! [Big Grin] This was after the poor thing sat in water for 2 weeks, then I read about the coffee thing and dumped 2 days worth of leftover coffee in it, plus the grounds. I glanced at it going by today, thought I saw new growth, but didn't dare look again...it might start spewing the green pea soup... [shocked] [lala] [Big Grin]

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I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
by Cricket on March 26, 2005 10:03 AM
Oh, no! Not the pea soup! [shocked] Remember, NEVER look straight at a gardenia - they're spiteful plants.
by Sheri&Kiki on March 26, 2005 10:10 AM
Yes, they are...I usually do no less than 3 Hail Mary's and hold out the crucifix before I look at it. [devil] [grin] [nutz]

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I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
by Amy R. on March 26, 2005 10:15 AM
Whoa there, Girlies. Get your backsides over to the gardenia thread for this kinda stuff, it needs to be bumped up! While you are there, could you throw in a post for me? Just mention "bud drop" and lots of expletives for me, pretty please.
by Sheri&Kiki on March 26, 2005 10:23 AM
Would you believe I may have discovered another plant as evil, possibly more so, as the gardenia? I'm beginning to think they both originated from the Shroud of Turin...it's the China Doll. [shocked]

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I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
by Sheri&Kiki on March 26, 2005 10:25 AM
Oh, BTW, I'm letting Will know this is additional and unclear. [grin]

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I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
by Cricket on March 26, 2005 10:57 AM
OMG, Sheri...I LOVE China Dolls!!!

It's a long, sad story, but after several years of living with a gorgeous, healthy China Doll, because of neglect due to circumstances way beyond my control, my lovely China Doll bit the dust just over a year ago. [tears] I've been searching for another ever since, but have only found really pricey ones.

Treat your China doll as you would a ficus. Bright, indirect light, moist soil (doesn't like to dry out). talk to her a lot, very gently touch her in homage of her beauty every time you pass (seriously, mine was so beautiful I had to touch her, but VERY gently - also keeps the dust off her leaves). They love to be adored, usually pout by dropping leaves when you change their circumstances, then just as quickly regrow bright new leaves. But if you give them enough love, they don't seem to pout as often. Both my China Doll and ficus have gone through 4 moves without losing leaves. I repotted my ficus 2 months ago - didn't bat a leaf! A happy China Doll will endlessly reward you by rapidly gracing your space with lush, new growth. Now I'll have to continue my search for another - can you tell I'm totally enamoured with China Dolls? [Embarrassed]

Well, I'm off to visit Amy in the gardenia thread - see you there! [wayey]

Cricket
by Will Creed on March 27, 2005 01:28 AM
In "addition" to being "unclear," I will attempt to shed some light on the original question. (Forget the Gardenias, China dolls, banana peels, coffee, pea soup, Hail Mary's, and girlie backsides that were introduced along the way!)

Wood ash is also called potash, which is a source of potassium. Potassium is one of the 3 major elements that plants require (the third of the 3 numbers listed on fertilizer labels).

If you are using depleted soil for your plants and you are philosophically opposed to using commercial fetilizer, then wood ash might be helpful. Probably a couple of tablespoons per 6-inch pot. But then you will also have to find sources of nitrogen, phophorous, and the trace elements to complete the job. Most wood ash is slightly alkaline, but the type of tree from whence it comes will affect its pH.

But why would you be using depleted soil in the first place? If you are using a decent potting mix, then there is no need to add the wood ash. Save it for your outdoor compost pile or spread it on your icy sidewalk instead of using calcium chloride.

Will The On-topic

If I am still unclear, try subtraction.
by Cricket on March 27, 2005 07:49 AM
Thanks, Will. [wayey] My intention isn't to use depleted soil for repotting - I thought ash would add beneficial nutrients to potting soil, even replacing chemical fertilizers. I have so much to learn - it's amazing my plants do as well as they do! [Big Grin]

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